Print Friendly and PDF
Consider This

A Scriptural Challenge to all Christians

Home Page
Articles
RNV eBook Format - 04/10/17
RNV PDF Format - 04/10/17
Links to the RNV
Email Brother Buck
Email Brother Craig
Email Brother Rick
Contact Us

Easter in the King James Version of Scripture

When the King James Version bible was translated, the title page was printed basically as you find it still today in Cambridge Bibles:

THE
HOLY BIBLE
CONTAINING THE
OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS
TRANSLATED OUT OF THE ORIGINAL TONGUES:
AND WITH THE FORMER TRANSLATIONS
DILIGENTLY COMPARED AND REVISED
BY HIS MAJESTY'S SPECIAL COMMAND
APPOINTED TO BE READ IN CHURCHES

Wikipedia states the following about the KJV:

Something that Wikipedia does not mention is that the KJV underwent several revisions and the one read today is the 1768 edition. If you will look at the true 1661 KJV you will probably find it very difficult to read.

I would now like to bring your attention back to the title page of the KJV. Please note how the translators capitalized the word His in the sentence right before the word authorized. Why was this done? Was it done to indicate that it was God (as they call Yahuwah) who authorized it? Of course it was! Is there any proof whatsoever that Yahuwah ever authorized the KJV? Of course not! This is a simply blatant deception used by the translators of the KJV to mislead the reader into thinking that the KJV is the only version "authorized" by Yahuwah, when in fact it never was.

Those people who own a King James Version bible, and claim that it is the only "authorized" version of scripture, are correct in that it is the only version of scripture that was "authorized" by King James, however, this does not mean that it is or ever was, "authorized" by Yahuwah.

Unhappily, the KJV has many errors of which this article will touch on briefly, however, the main focus of the article is on the inclusion of the erroneous word Easter in the KJV.

The KJV is an English translation of the Textus Receptus. The Textus Receptus (Latin for "Received Text") is a collection printed Greek texts that provided the textual base for the vernacular translations of the Reformation Period. This collection of printed Greek texts constituted the translation base for the original German Luther Bible, the translation of the Greek text into English by William Tyndale, the King James Version, and most other Reformation-era "New Testament" translations throughout Western and Central Europe.

One large issue within the KJV is that while it used the Textus Receptus as its base for translation, it disagrees with the Textus Receptus in many instances. Below is a partial list of where the KJV conflicts with the Textus Receptus.

KJV translates... Textus Receptus actually says...
"robbers of churches." Acts 19:37 Every known Greek manuscript has HIEROSULOUS - "robbers of temples"
"Lucifer" Is 14:12 "O Day Star" (Lucifer is a human origin nickname for the Devil in the 1600's refers not to the devil but the king of Babylon)
"Easter" Acts 12:4 "Passover" (Easter very poor choice as it confuses the pagan origin Roman Catholic "Easter" holy day with what the TR clearly says is the Yahudiym Passover!)
"Baptism" (all occurrences) Acts 2:38; 22:16 immersion, because sprinkling was the mode of "baptism" in 1611 CE, they jelly-fished out and transliterated the Greek "baptizo" but refused to translate it.
"Tithes of all I possess" Lk 18:12 "all I acquire" (Not only variant with the TR, but quite wrong. Tithes were never paid on capital, only increase)
"Schoolmaster" Gal 3:24 "attendant" (the law was the one who brought us to the Anointed, not taught us about the Anointed)
"God save the King": 1Sam 10:24, 2Sam 16:16, 1Kings 1:25 "May the king live" ("God" not in TR, but reflects the British culture of the 1600's. Proof that the translators used dynamic equivalents.)
"God Forbid." Ro. 3:4,6,31; 6:2,15; 7:7,13; 9:14; 11:1,11; 1 Co. 6:15; Ga. 2:17; 3:21; 6:14 "may it not be" or "let it not be." (KJV adds the word "God" where it is absent in the TR because it was a common expression in 1600's. Proof that the translators used dynamic equivalents.)
"sweet savour" Lev 6:21; 8:28; 17:6; 23:18 "soothing aroma" (KJV appeals to wrong senses - taste instead of smell in the TR)
"ashes upon his face" 1 Kings 20:38 "bandage over his eyes" (KJV varies from TR by using ashes)
"flagon" 2 Sam 6:19; 1 Chron 16:3; SoS 2:5; Hosea 3:1 These verses contain the word "flagon" which is a fluted cup from which liquid is drunk. However, the Ibriy (Hebrew) word is "ashishah" which has always meant raisins or raisin cakes. This is especially true in Hos 3:1 because raisin cakes were often offered to idols. This is an obvious error in translation.

Further, there are many inconsistencies in translating identical words and phrases in the KJV itself:

KJV translates identical Greek phrases differently in each verse

Obviously, the King James Version is NOT flawless. For anyone to take the stance that the KJV is flawless, simply reveals that they do not have all of the facts.

Let us now get back to the main focus of this article, which is on the topic of the pagan goddesses name of Easter being included in what is supposed to be Yahuwah's Sacred scripture.

The word or name of Easter is found in the KJV in the book of Acts chapter 12 verse 4.

I have included the Strong's number G3957 for the word which has been translated as Easter in the above verse so we can see what Strong's concordance and dictionary states is the Greek word.

Strong's lists the following information:

We see that Strong's lists the Greek word as being {pa,sca} pascha, which is defined as the Passover. Interestingly, we also see the word Easter right next to the word Passover. Then Strong's states that there are 29 total occurrences of the Greek Word in the KJV. But why does Strong list the pagan name of Easter next to the word Passover? Because the KJV uses the word or name Easter once as the definition of the Greek word pascha, therefore, Strong was required to include it.

Below are all 29 verses from the KJV (including Strong's numbers) which use the Greek word pascha, and how it has been translated. Please note that in every instance except one the English word used in the KJV is translated as passover, G3957.

So why would the KJV use the pagan name of the goddess Easter in Acts 12:4?

According to some so-called "bible scholars" who support the KJV, the use of Easter is due to the preceding verse.

Because these days were called "the days of unleavened bread," which they insist come AFTER the Passover, they reason that the timing or sequence would be wrong if the word Passover was used in the next verse.

Had these "bible scholars" made the attempt to put this passage in context, they would see that from the Passover all the way to the end of the Festival of Unleavened Bread eight days later was lumped together under the word Passover as shown below.

When we open our minds and hearts to Yahuwah and ask for His guidance when reading His Word, He will reveal His truth to us.

Certainly the writers of the Textus Receptus knew of the pagan goddess of spring, and if they had meant that the time of Keph's delivering to the people was to take place during a time of a celebration of a pagan goddess they would have used the name for one of those goddesses, possibly Ashtoreth from ancient Israel, or Astarte from ancient Greece.

A popular theory on the name of the pagan goddess Easter which is used in the KJV, is that the name of Easter was derived from an ancient word for spring: "eastre." Then again, there were many other similar goddesses that were known by other names in ancient cultures around the Mediterranean, and were celebrated in the springtime as well. Some of their names were:

So we see that the writers of the Textus Receptus had many possible choices of pagan goddesses they could have picked from if they actually did not mean Passover when they used the Greek word pascha. When studying Yahuwah's word, we may run across instances where something does not seem to be correct or is confusing, as in the case of the timing of Keph's arrest in Acts 12:3-4. However when we humble ourselves and approach Yahuwah in prayer over such instances He will reveal His truth to us. We must not adhere to the teachings of men, and be willing to open our hearts and our minds to His truth, even when it goes against something we might have thought to be correct for many years.

Craig Timmreck
http://www.considerthis.net
craig@considerthis.net